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The What's YOUR Story? BLOG is an opportunity for ACS readers to share ideas, thoughts and information about their love of reading!
 
 
Welcome to the ACS Did You Know?challenge!
 
Sentence Submission  wow instructions
 
 
 
  • Did You Know? Challenge - Week Thirty

    Posted by Laura Penn at 5/19/2017

    In 1903 the Wright Brothers flew for the first time. 66 years later, man landed on the Moon in 1969.

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  • Did You Know? Challenge - Week Twenty-Nine

    Posted by Laura Penn at 4/28/2017

    While reading, people are prone to subconsciously take on attributes of factional characters? This phenomenon is known as “experience-taking”.

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  • Did You Know? Challenge - Week Twenty-Eight

    Posted by Laura Penn at 4/22/2017

    “History itself  possesses interest for us more as the unfolding of certain moral and mental developments than as the mere enumeration of facts.” Historical fiction offers an “analysis of recognizable human character within a specific set of circumstances,” such that we can “re-experience the social and human motives which led people to think, feel and act as they did in historical reality.” Historical fiction develops an “awareness that the events of history have an impact on the contemporary.” Historical fiction gives “the reader insight into the mind of a member of a past society” and therefore induces empathy and a “live connection between then and now.” The historical novel allows us “to contemplate social change.” We see change in hindsight, “which then allows the individual to reflect upon their contemporary circumstance.” Similarly, historical fiction can trace the “path of religious and political change.” “One of the major elements of the historical novel has been as an expression of national character and self-definition.” It allows us to explore the ways “nations, and therefore national identity, are constructed.” "Historical fiction can “report from places made marginal [by history] and present a dissident or dissenting account of the past.” Historical fiction allows us to “understand the extremes of human behavior.” The novel can explore “various ways of facing, understanding and living with the horrific events in the past.” Historical fiction helps us retain the past. Noble purposes indeed. Something to think about the next time you enjoy historical fiction.

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  • Did You Know? Challenge - Week Twenty-Seven

    Posted by Laura Penn at 4/17/2017

    Alan Gratz’s first novel, Samurai Shortstop, was named one of the American Library Association's 2007 Top Ten Best Books for Young Adults. His second novel, Something Rotten, was a 2008 ALA Quick Pick for Young Adult Readers. His first middle grade novel, The Brooklyn Nine, was one of the ALA’s Top Ten Sports Books for Youth and Top Ten Historical Books for Youth, and his YA Holocaust novel Prisoner B-3087 was one of YALSA’s 2014 Best Fiction for Young Readers and has won seven state awards.  His latest novels are the YA thriller Code of Honor, a YALSA 2016 Quick Pick for Reluctant Readers.

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  • Did You Know? Challenge - Week Twenty-Six (First one for MP4)

    Posted by Laura Penn at 4/2/2017

    In order to escape a Black Hole, you would need to accelerate faster than the speed of light.  Since there is nothing faster than the speed of light, nothing would escape a Black Hole.

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  • Word of the Week Challenge - Week Twenty-Five

    Posted by Laura Penn at 3/22/2017

    BCE (Before Common Era) and BC (Before Christ) mean the same thing- previous to year 1 CE (Common Era). This is the same as the year AD 1 (Anno Domini); the latter means “in the year of the lord,” often translated as “in the year of our lord.”

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  • Word of the Week Challenge - Week Twenty-Four

    Posted by Laura Penn at 3/17/2017

    SPRING EQUINOX: the time when the sun crosses the plane of the earth's equator, making night and day of approximately equal length all over the earth and occurring about March 21st 

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  • Word of the Week Challenge - Week Twenty-Three

    Posted by Laura Penn at 3/3/2017

    Adversity: unfavorable fortune or fate; a condition marked by misfortune, calamity, or distress.

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  • Word of the Week Challenge - Week Twenty-Two

    Posted by Laura Penn at 2/24/2017

    Fatigue: extreme tiredness, typically resulting from mental or physical exertion or illness.

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  • Word of the Week Challenge - Week Twenty-One

    Posted by Laura Penn at 2/15/2017

    STAMINA – great physical or mental strength that allows you to continue doing something for a long time.

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